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Infanticide

Definition

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in·fan·ti·cide
- noun

1. the act of killing an infant.
2. the practice of killing newborn infants.
3. a person who kills an infant.

Infanticide cases have popped up over the years. Most recently with Philadelphia Abortionist Kermit Gosnell but there have been others. Here are some recent cases where abortionists and their staff have killed babies born alive after abortion.


Baby Born-Alive in Abortion, Is Stuffed in Biohazard Bag and Thrown on Roof to Avoid Detection by Police
By Sue Cirba


The shocked mother later reported, her baby “was gasping for air” and made “hissing sounds only.” “I was supposed to be asleep for all of this. I wasn’t supposed to see anything.”

In 2006, eighteen-year-old Sycloria Williams paid $1,200 to abortionist Pierre Jean Jacque Renelique to abort her unborn child of 23 weeks gestation. The Hollywood, Florida resident, who is now 21, has filed a civil lawsuit accusing the clinic staff of delivering her child alive and killing the newborn girl by stuffing her into a biohazard bag. Details of the case show an appalling lack of information given to women seeking abortion, and an appalling disregard for the lives of both mother and child. Ms. Williams shared her story with the Florida Catholic in January because people “need to know.” Ms. Williams says she has changed her mind about abortion since her horrifying experience.

Sycloria Williams did not plan to have an abortion, but when her baby’s biological father left after Sycloria told him she was pregnant, she chose abortion thinking her unborn baby was “just a blob..”

On July 17, 2006, Ms. Williams went to Miramar Woman Center Inc. where she signed consent forms and was given a prescription for Cytotec, a drug to induce the abortion before even meeting Dr. Renelique, who would perform the abortion. Williams was also told she needed to have the more expensive late term abortion as a sonogram determined Williams was 23 weeks into her pregnancy.

Two days later, Williams first met Dr. Renelique at A Woman’s Care, Inc. in Miami. Though she asked questions, the abortionist gave her a vague account of what would happen. Dr. Renelique inserted lamanaria sticks to dilate the cervix. Williams was given a prescription and told to come back the next day. Williams later received a call and was told to go to their Hialeah clinic, A GYN where Renelique was supposed to meet her the next day. She later received a call telling her to go to a different clinic. On the way to the clinic the next morning, her boyfriend at the time, Shane, “didn’t want to go through with it.” Williams arrived at the Hialeah abortion center but they weren’t open yet. Ms. Williams knocked on the door and was let in by the receptionist, Rosemary Chaneton. The receptionist gave her two white pills to take but Williams didn’t know what they were. According to the lawsuit, the white pills were another dose of Cytotec, to induce labor.

Ms. Williams went to wait in the car with her boyfriend, Shane, but was beginning to feel sick. After 45 minutes, Williams felt the baby dropping and went into the abortion clinic. Ms. Williams was taken to a patient waiting room in the back and Shane was not allowed to enter.

“I was alone in that room for about three hours with Rosemary (the receptionist) and other people checking up on me every couple minutes,” Williams stated in her interview with the Florida Catholic. “I was nauseated and I had a temperature,” she said. The doctor had not arrived. “I was supposed to be asleep for all of this. I wasn’t supposed to see anything. Just wake up and it will all be over,” Williams continued.

Ms. Williams’ lawsuit states that the receptionist and the staff began screaming and rushing around while Williams stood against the wall, glancing in horror at her newborn baby. “She wasn’t moving much. Twitching, gasping for air. She wasn’t crying though, just hissing. Hissing sounds only.” Ms. Williams stated. No one called an ambulance. Ms. Williams charged, the clinic owner, Ms. Gonzalez, cut the umbilical cord, placed the baby into a red biohazard bag, sealed it and tossed it into a trash can. Ms. Gonzalez has no health care license. When the doctor arrived, he gave Ms. Williams a shot to put her to sleep.

Ms. Williams did not expect to see a fully formed baby.. On the drive home from the clinic Ms. Williams told her boyfriend she did not think the baby was dead. He questioned her further. The next day Hialeah homicide detectives showed up at Ms. Williams’ door saying they were tipped off by an anonymous caller. Ms. Williams spent four hours at the police station and filed more reports the next day. Hialeah police searched the abortion center and found medical records but did not find the baby’s body. Another anonymous caller told police the baby’s body was hidden on the roof, but it would take two more searches before the remains were found.

The Florida Board of Medicine on February 6th, permanently revoked Pierre Jean-Jacques Renelique license to practice medicine as a result of this incident. Felony charges have been brought against the clinic owner Belkis Gonzalez, though not homicide charges.

The Thomas More Society, representing Ms. Williams in her civil suit, reacted to the charges filed against Ms. Gonzalez on March 3: “While we most certainly welcome the bringing of criminal charges against Ms. Gonzalez, whose abortion business represents nothing less than a serious public health hazard, we must express our grave disappointment, indeed our outrage, that no homicide charges have been brought on account of the wrongful death of this little girl,” said Tom Brejcha, president and chief counsel of the Thomas More Society. “Not only the coroner’s report, but also eyewitness testimony, prove that this infant was born alive then brutally killed. That constitutes homicide under the law of Florida and treating it as anything less than that ignores fundamental legal principles and offends simple human decency. We demand that Dade County’s law enforcers add a homicide charge, or at least an attempted homicide charge, without any more delay.” he continued. To continue to follow this case, visit the Thomas More society’s web site at www.thomasmoresociety.org





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